History of the Slavic Collections at Harvard
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This guide provides a starting point for research for students, faculty, and visiting researchers in Slavic and Eurasian studies at Harvard University. It includes selective lists of reference resources, both online and in print.
Last Updated: Oct 6, 2014 URL: http://guides.library.harvard.edu/slavicstudies Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

Getting started Print Page
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Welcome!

This guide provides a starting point for research for students, faculty, and visiting researchers in Slavic and Eurasian studies at Harvard University. It includes selective lists of reference resources, both online and in print.

Illustration: Izbornik Sviatoslava, 1073 (M853 H GIM Sin. 1043 (Harvard Fine Arts Library, Visual Collections - Slides and Digital Images)) Image from VIA (Harvard University Library Visual Information Access).

 

 

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Highlights of Harvard's Slavic collections

Psaltir s Posledovanjem (Cetinje, 1495) – only copy recorded outside Eastern Europe and Russia and the earliest Old Church Slavonic printed book at Harvard.

Ivan Fedorov’s Primer (L’viv, 1574) – first book to be published on the territory of Ukraine and one of only two known copies outside Eastern Europe and Russia.

The Kilgour collection of Russian literature (1750-1920) – one of the finest collection of first editions of Russian belles-lettres, from Lomonosov to Blok, including the complete set of Pushkin's first editions.

The archives of Leon Trotsky (1904-1941), including Soviet and Exile papers.

Andrei Sakharov Archives.

The Millman Parry Collection of South Slavic Oral Literature.

Laura Boulton Collection of Byzantine Eastern Orthodox Chant (Armenian, Russian, Coptic, Ethiopian, and related repertoires).

Pre-Soviet Russian Law Collection.

The Solidarity Bibliographic Center collection of independent, underground, and uncensored Polish publications (1970s-1990).

The Czech and Slovak "samizdat" collection (1970-1989).

The independent/unofficial press of the Soviet Union (1987-1991).

Russian political ephemera (late 1980s-1990s)

Political and cultural ephemera from Russia, Ukraine, and Yugoslavia (1990s-present).

The collection of Soviet military topographic maps of the European areas of the Soviet Union. (Search HOLLIS for Author: "Soviet Union. Sovetskai͡a Armii͡a. Generalʹnyĭ shtab.")

Harvard Project on the Soviet Social System/Harvard Interview Project (1949-1953).

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana Collection on Russian Theater (1917-1941).

Ballets Russes Designs.

Ukrainian Archives and Manuscript Collections (1870s-present).

Bohdan and Neonila Krawciw Ucrainica Map Collection. (Read a description of the collection here.)

Thomas C. Owen collection on Russian social, economic, and business history since 1800. 1972-2005.  

Slavic poor paper Digitization Project (pre-1921 imprints online)

 

Online catalogs

The Harvard Library uses two online catalogs:  HOLLIS+ and HOLLIS Classic.

To learn more about HOLLIS+, please visit the HOLLIS+ Quick Tips library guide. For help with HOLLIS Classic, please see HOLLIS Classic Help page.  

 

Searching in transliteration

To render Cyrillic words using Roman characters, both the HOLLIS+ and HOLLIS Classic catalogs use the Library of Congress system of transliteration. Most other U.S. library catalogs and databases use the same system, though several others are in use in Europe, the former Soviet Union, and in other contexts.

The following page on the Library of Congress web site provides transliteration tables for various non-Roman languages, including Slavic and non-Slavic languages that use Cyrillic alphabet:

ALA-LA Romanization tables

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