Current Book Talk Schedule

The Orphans of Davenport book cover imageThe Orphans of Davenport: Eugenics, the Great Depression, and the War over Children's Intelligence

Written by Marilyn Brookwood, Ed.M.'08

Monday, February 7, 2022 12-1p.m. EST (online)

Please register: bit.ly/OrphansOfDavenport

About the book: In The Orphans of Davenport, psychologist and esteemed historian Marilyn Brookwood chronicles how a band of young psychologists in 1930s Iowa shattered the nature-versus-nurture debate and overthrew long-accepted racist and classist views of childhood development. Transporting readers to a rural Iowa devastated by dust storms and economic collapse, Brookwood reveals just how profoundly unlikely it was for this breakthrough to come from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station. Funded by the University of Iowa and the Rockefeller Foundation, and modeled on America’s experimental agricultural stations, the Iowa Station was virtually unknown, a backwater compared to the renowned psychology faculties of Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. 

About the event: This book talk will be live-captioned! Marilyn Brookwood is a psychologist who has worked in public education and held an adjunct faculty position at the College of New Rochelle in New York. The author will be introduced by Mary Bennett, State Collections Coordinator for the State Historical Society of Iowa. 

Where to read: More information about the book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here. 

Latinx Experiences in U.S. Schools book cover image Latinx Experiences in U.S. Schools: Voices of Students, Teachers, Teacher Educators, and Education Allies in Challenging Sociopolitical Times

Edited by Margarita Jiménez-Silva, Ed.M.'92, Ed.D.'02 and Janine Bempechat, Ed.M.'79, Ed.D.'86

Monday, February 28, 2022 12-1p.m. EST (online)

Please register: bit.ly/LatinxExperiences

About the book: This edited volume brings together voices of Latinx students, teachers, teacher educators, and education allies in Latinx communities to reveal ways in which today’s sociopolitical context has given rise to politically-sanctioned hateful anti-immigrant rhetoric. Contributors—key stakeholders in the education of immigrant Latinx children, youth, and college students—share how this rhetoric has exacerbated existing systemic injustices within K-Higher Education. They draw attention to counternarratives that speak to leadership and strength of community. Contributors include high school and college students and faculty, community organizers, and early career academics, whose voices are too often underrepresented in academic conversations. This book highlights professional and personal acts of courage, community organization, and the transformation of students and educators who are stepping into leadership roles to affect change. Understanding that teaching and learning are political acts, we call all those vested in Latinx communities to engage in small and large acts of agency to collectively impact change in our K-Higher Education systems.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! The editors of this important book will be introduced by Dr. Eleonora Villegas-Reimers, Clinical Professor and Chair of the Department of Teaching & Learning at Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development.

Where to read: More information about the book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here

Publishing Journal Articles A Scientific Guide for New Authors Worldwide book cover imagePublishing Journal Articles: A Scientific Guide for New Authors Worldwide

Written by Zheng Yan, Ed.D.'00

Friday, March 4, 2022 12-1p.m. EST (online)

Please register: bit.ly/PubJournal

About the book: Journal publication and grant writing are two core professional skills for new scholars today. However, systematic training is not typically offered in graduate programs worldwide. This book equips readers with the current scientific knowledge by providing a concise introduction to the science of journal article publication. The overall structure generally matches the curriculum of a graduate course and each chapter features a learning sequence based on Daniel Kahneman's intuitive judgement theory. The volume analyzes the intuitive thoughts of new authors from a variety of countries, uses over fifty real-life cases, and focuses on core concepts from nearly 100 research articles. It provides scientific advice for new authors, junior researchers, and graduate students to publish their scholarly work and advance their academic careers.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! Dr. Yan, Professor & Division Director, Educational Psychology and Methodology at SUNY Albany, will be introduced by Catherine Snow, John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at Harvard Graduate School of Education. 

Where to read: HarvardKey users can access the e-book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here

The Art of Talking to Children book coverThe Art of Talking with Children: The Simple Keys to Nurturing Kindness, Creativity, and Confidence in Kids

Written by Rebecca Rolland

Monday, March 21, 2022 12-1p.m. EDT (online)

Please register: bit.ly/ArtOfTalking

About the book: From a Harvard faculty member and oral language specialist, an invaluable guide that gives readers evidence-based tools and techniques to communicate more effectively with children in ways that let them foster relationships with less conflict and more joy and kindness.

Science has shown that the best way to help our kids become independent, confident, kind, empathetic, and happy is by talking with them. Yet, so often, parents, educators, and caregivers have trouble communicating with kids. Conversations can feel trivial or strained—or worse, are marked by constant conflict.

In The Art of Talking with Children, Rebecca Rolland, a Harvard Graduate School of Education lecturer, Harvard Medical School faculty member, speech pathologist, and mother, arms adults with practical tools to help them have productive and meaningful conversations with children of all ages—whether it’s engaging an obstinate toddler or getting the most monosyllabic adolescent to open up.
The Art of Talking with Children shows us how quality communication—or rich talk—can help us build the skills and capacities children need to thrive.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! 

Where to read: More information about the book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here

Leadership through Mentoring book cover image Leadership Through Mentoring: The Key to Improving the Confidence and Skill of Principals

Written by Phyllis A. Gimbel, Ed.M.'95 and Peter Gow

Monday, April 4, 2022 12-1p.m. EDT (online)

Please register: bit.ly/LeadershipThroughMentoring

About the book: Leadership Through Mentoring: The Key to Improving the Principals Confidence and Skill lays out the case for the development of robust mentorship programs to support new school leaders. With principal turnover at an all-time high, it is urgent that schools and districts find ways to help newly appointed leaders grow into effective supervisors, managers, and strategic thinkers who can also find personal and professional satisfaction in their careers. Using examples from several established and successful state programs, Leadership Through Mentoring shows how new school leaders’ effectiveness, vision, and engagement can be grown through intentionally designed and executed programs that offer supportive guidance and wise counsel from experienced leaders. Thoughtfully created and appropriately resourced, such programs can pave the way to longer and more successful principal tenures, which research shows lead directly to significant improvements in schools’ cultures, educational efficacy, and teacher and student performance. This is a book for leaders and governing bodies in all kinds of schools.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! 

Where to read: More information about the book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here

Image of Right Where We Belong book cover (colorful flowers)Right Where We Belong: How Refugee Teachers and Students Are Changing the Future of Education -- Sarah Dryden-Peterson in conversation with Vidur Chopra, Zuhra Faizi, and Celia Reddick

Written by Sarah Dryden-Peterson

Friday, April 8, 2022 12-1p.m. EDT (online)

Please register: bit.ly/RightWhereWeBelong

About the book: Half of the world’s 26 million refugees are children. Their formal education is disrupted, and their lives are too often dominated by exclusion and uncertainty about what the future holds. Even kids who have the opportunity to attend school face enormous challenges, as they struggle to integrate into unfamiliar societies and educational environments.

In Right Where We Belong, Sarah Dryden-Peterson discovers that, where governments and international agencies have been stymied, refugee teachers and students themselves are leading. From open-air classrooms in Uganda to the hallways of high schools in Maine, new visions for refugee education are emerging. Dryden-Peterson introduces us to people like Jacques—a teacher who created a school for his fellow Congolese refugees in defiance of local laws—and Hassan, a Somali refugee navigating the social world of the American teenager. Drawing on more than 600 interviews in twenty-three countries, Dryden-Peterson shows how teachers and students are experimenting with flexible forms of learning. Rather than adopt the unrealistic notion that all will soon return to “normal,” these schools embrace unfamiliarity, develop students’ adaptiveness, and demonstrate how children, teachers, and community members can build supportive relationships across lines of difference.

It turns out that policymakers, activists, and educators have a lot to learn from displaced children and teachers. Their stories point the way to better futures for refugee students and inspire us to reimagine education broadly, so that children everywhere are better prepared to thrive in a diverse and unpredictable world.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! Dr. Sarah Dryden-Peterson, AB’97, Ed.D.’09, is Associate Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and founder and director of REACH. She will be joined by Vidur Chopra, Bruce S. Goldberg Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Teachers College, Columbia University, Zuhra Faizi, Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Celia Reddick, PhD candidate, HGSE.

Where to read: More information about the book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here

Book cover of Not Paved for UsNot Paved for Us: Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia

Written by Camika Royal

Monday, April 11, 2022 12-1p.m. EDT (online)

Please register: bit.ly/NotPavedForUs

About the book: Not Paved for Us chronicles a fifty-year period in Philadelphia education, and offers a critical look at how school reform efforts do and do not transform outcomes for Black students and educators. In a bracing critique, urban education scholar Camika Royal bears witness to the ways in which positive public school reform has been obstructed: through racism and racial capitalism, but also via liberal ideals, neoliberal practices, and austerity tactics. Royal shows how, despite the well-intended actions of larger entities, the weight of school reform, here as in other large urban districts, has been borne by educators striving to meet the extensive needs of their students, families, and communities with only the slightest material, financial, and human resources. She draws on the experiences of Black educators and community members and documents their contributions.
Not Paved for Us highlights the experiences of Black educators as they navigate the racial and cultural politics of urban school reform. Ultimately, Royal names, dissects, and challenges the presence of racism in school reform policies and practices while calling for an antiracist future.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! Camika Royal is the associate professor of Urban Education at Loyola University Maryland. 

Where to read: More information about the book here

This book talk was not recorded.

Trauma-Responsive Schooling book cover image Trauma-Responsive Schooling: Centering Student Voice and Healing

Written by Lyn Mikel Brown,Ed.D.'89, Catharine Biddle, and Mark Tappan, Ed.D.'87

Monday, April 18, 2022 12-1p.m. EDT (online)

Please register: bit.ly/TraumaResponsiveSchooling

About the book: Trauma-Responsive Schooling outlines a novel approach to transforming American schools through student-centered, trauma-informed practices. The book chronicles the use of an innovative educational model, Trauma-Responsive Equitable Education (TREE), as part of a multiyear research project in two elementary schools in rural Maine. In this model, Lyn Mikel Brown, Catharine Biddle, and Mark Tappan endorse whole-school change, encouraging educators to upend traditional classroom power dynamics by listening foremost to student voices, validating student experiences, and promoting student agency. The authors provide complex real-life examples of student involvement in the creation and implementation of trauma-responsive and equitable practices. Their work offers readers concrete, actionable examples of such practices, which include supporting the whole child by promoting social and emotional learning (SEL) as well as academic achievement; providing access to basic needs such as food, clothing, and health care; and meeting the instructional requirements of dual-language learners.

About the event: This event will be live-captioned! 

Where to read: More information about the book here

Watch a closed-captioned video of the book talk here